Sessions Focused on Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) - Programs

ALA’s Office for Diversity, Literacy and Outreach Services (ODLOS) curated this list for conference attendees who may be interested in sessions targeting equity, diversity and inclusion (EDI). The sessions are grouped by session type with definitions to guide attendees through the selections. Please note that this information was curated by ODLOS specifically, there may be some flexibility in each session’s categorization and/or level of understanding. 

Programs may include:

  • Chair’s or President’s Program - A session that is planned by by a roundtable’s chair or division’s president. Each roundtable and division has a guaranteed program slot. 
  • Juried Program -  A program that was  vetted by a dedicated committee of ALA members. The committee members review and approve a certain number of programs from numerous program submissions. 
  • Program - A program hosted by a specific division. 

Definitions of Levels of Understanding

Introductory Level - These sessions are geared toward attendees who have no prior or little experience with equity, diversity, or inclusion topics. Attendees who have limited knowledge of equity, diversity, and inclusion are encouraged to attend these sessions.  

Intermediate Level - These sessions are appropriate for attendees who have attended a few webinars or workshops surrounding equity, diversity, and inclusion and would like to learn more. These sessions start analyzing how the library profession can decenter power. 

Advanced Level - These sessions are appropriate for those who are experienced with nuanced concepts of social justice, power and privilege, identity, equity, and inclusion. Attendees who are facilitators and leaders in areas of equity, diversity, and inclusion and those looking to deepen their knowledge are encouraged to attend.


Programs

The New Frontier: Hot Topics Engaging Older Adults 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 8:30 a.m. - 10 a.m.
Across the nation the Baby Boomer generation are retiring in greater and greater number, representing a critical opportunity for libraries to deepen engagements with seniors. From creative arts to workforce development, this program will focus on design concepts for inclusive library programming based on emerging and relevant hot topics. Hear from a panel of librarians who will offer a multifaceted perspective on pertinent issues as well as practical strategies to jumpstart engaging and successful library efforts for mature audiences.   

Using Innovative, Map-Based Outreach Programs to Reach Students of all Levels 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 8:30 a.m. - 10 a.m.
There is a consensus that maps are extremely effective forms of communication. 80% of all data has a spatial component.
Are you responsible for outreach program in your libraries? You will leave this session with five learning outcomes:
Learn more about “Map Inquiry Kits” developed as map-centric research activities
How to make use of years of digitization work in cartographic resources in outreach programs
How to help students to deepen content and context understanding of maps to generate rich and powerful learning and construct knowledge
Use maps to meet educational core standards
Use maps to promote lifelong learning and community enrichment

ABCs of Access- DRM, ADA, OA, OER: A Panel Discussion with Publisher, Aggregator, University Publisher 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.
Panel Discussion with a publisher (Sage Publishing), aggregator (Ebsco) and a conglomerate of university publishers (JSTOR) on Publishing issues such as DRM, ADA Compliance, Open Access, Open Educational Resources with Librarian and University Learning Resources Services. The publishing representatives will speak to what is currently occurring in the publishing arena as to these issues and the Librarian and Learning Resources Moderators will posit questions from other librarians and from the audience to the speakers. Each speaker will speak on a particular issue and then open up for discussion and questions.

Counting on Trust, Trusting the Count: Census 2020 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 23, 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Many in our communities recognize the critical importance of acknowledging rising levels of “justified mistrust” in a Census process that has become simultaneously politicized and divisive. By convening a panel of experts in Census data and the social context for the Census, we hope to learn how we can understand and better advocate for the continuation and extension of the existing protections that prevent the misuse of administrative data for politicized ends.

Climbing the Ladder: African American Deans and Directors Speak On Leadership 
Type: Juried Program
Level of Understanding: Advanced
June 22, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.
Librarians who are new to the profession or those who are approaching mid-career and are contemplating moving into management often seek advice on how to advance in the profession. African American Library Deans from predominantly white institutions (PWIs) and historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), representing both private and public institutions, will discuss the supervisory and managerial skillsets necessary to advance in academic libraries. This presentation is designed to offer mentoring tips and suggest career pathways for those who want to transition into administrative levels of librarianship.

New Destinations in the Recruitment, Retention and Advancement of People of Color to the Library Profession 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Advanced
June 22, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.
After decades of various diversity initiatives, new avenues and dialogue on achieving diversity among library and information studies students and the library workforce are still needed. This presentation examines the current state of recruitment, retention and advancement of people of color to the library profession. The white papers from the REFORMA Telling Our Stories: Community Building to Recruit and Retain Latinx to the Library Profession grant and the Hampton University Forum on Minority Recruitment and Retention in the LIS Field grant, both awarded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), will offer current insights into this important topic.

Nourishing Literacy: Cooking with Youth in Your Library 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.
The Free Library of Philadelphia’s Culinary Literacy Center opened in June of 2014, providing innovative and accessible public programming to children and adults throughout Philadelphia. The Culinary Literacy Center’s mission is to advance literacy through food and cooking around a communal table. Our goal is to do this work in a way that inspires curiosity and fun among participants. Nourishing Literacy is the Culinary Literacy Center’s multidisciplinary school visit program, now in its fifth year. Class groups of children and older youth, from Pre-K and up visit our kitchen classroom, ranging in group sizes from twenty to thirty-six students . Lessons use cooking as the context for teaching literacy, nutrition, science, and more. Each lesson is part of a larger unit that includes activities and resources that can be used by the classroom teacher to implement before and after the library visit.

The Culinary Literacy Center provides unique opportunities for connecting a wide audience to the resources of the Free Library of Philadelphia. Through Nourishing Literacy, children are introduced to our library system, and inspired to grow as library users. Classroom teachers are given the ability to extend unit learning within various departments, resources, and collections within the library. One of the goals of Nourishing Literacy is to help to nurture students to become lifelong library users.

In this workshop, Culinary Literacy Center Director, Liz Fitzgerald, Nourishing Literacy Program Manager, Shayna Marmar, and Nourishing Literacy Kitchen Teacher, Iuliia Ellingsworth will share best practices for involving school students, classroom teachers, and volunteers in school trips and outreach visits. Ideas and insights for applying practical and engaging culinary activities in library settings of all kinds will be provided. While the majority of our cooking classes are taught either in our Culinary Literacy Center kitchen classroom, or with the use of our Culinary Literacy Carts, our lesson activities can be replicated with limited, accessible materials. Information about our Culinary Literacy Kits and tips on putting together a similar, affordable kit will be shared, in addition to other resources. Opportunities to interact with materials will be provided, as well as the chance to get a small taste of our activities and foods! 

Outreach Services - We're Out There 
Type: President’s Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.
The presentation will talk about the importance of Outreach Services in our communities, showcase success stories from around the country, and discuss the importance of gathering our data for sharing and providing the details people seek about our services through the BOIR Project database tool.

Pitfalls of neutrality: What does inclusivity mean in libraries
Type: Juried Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 22, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.Librarians are committed to promoting equity, diversity, and inclusion, but what does this mean in today’s political climate? We are frequently required to make decisions that pit free speech against the comfort and safety of other patrons (e.g. allowing political or hate groups to use our meeting rooms), or called upon to defend our collection, exhibit, or program decisions in the face of patron challenges. Even our decisions about configuring the space in our libraries may create controversy - gender neutral restrooms, prayer rooms, lactation rooms, or how we make our buildings accessible. This program will bring together a diverse group of speakers who have handled these challenges. They will share their experiences and how they dealt with various situations. Attendees will have the chance to ask questions and interact with the speakers and each other. They will leave the program with strategies from different libraries to consider when examining their own perspectives on equity, diversity, and inclusion and how to address these issues in their libraries. The program is co-sponsored by the ALA Office of Intellectual Freedom. 

New Destinations in the Recruitment, Retention and Advancement of People of Color to the Library Profession 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Advanced
June 22, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.
After decades of various diversity initiatives, new avenues and dialogue on achieving diversity among library and information studies students and the library workforce are still needed. This presentation examines the current state of recruitment, retention and advancement of people of color to the library profession. The white papers from the REFORMA Telling Our Stories: Community Building to Recruit and Retain Latinx to the Library Profession grant and the Hampton University Forum on Minority Recruitment and Retention in the LIS Field grant, both awarded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), will offer current insights into this important topic.

Self Care Is Not Selfish: Preventing Burnout 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.
Library work, in any role and any type of library, can take a heavy toll on people. This panel presentation will address best practices for self-care from three perspectives: what you can do for yourself, what you can do as a coworker for others, and what you (or others) can do in management roles. Hear from a variety of library staff in different roles and types of libraries. Participants will come away with practical tips and action items to implement right away to better take care of yourself, others, and to foster a physically and mentally healthy work environment.

The Urgency of History: How Librarians Prepare Kids for Their Times
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.
The past is prologue. But whose past and told in whose voice? How do you determine truth? What’s fact or fake, balanced or biased, narrow-minded or inclusive, detached or empathic? Drawing on personal experience, award-winning authors discuss the complex, often controversial process of unpacking and presenting history in fiction and nonfiction. Drawing on work in school and public libraries, they offer librarians tested, easy-to-replicate ideas to excite kids about their connection to history and propel them to write untold stories. This program focuses on how to nurture critical thinking skills, vital in these turbulent times.

APALA President’s Program: The Things We Do Make A Difference 
Type: President’s Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 22, 10 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
In 2020, the Asian Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA) will celebrate its 40th anniversary in serving and advocating for APA librarians and communities. Throughout the years, APALA has been involved in providing library services such as programming and diverse collections to libraries. In addition, the organization has been in the forefront of discussions on larger issues in the profession and library services such as equity, diversity, and inclusion. As APALA reaches another milestone, its members are continuing essential and innovative work in and out of libraries.

This Asian Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA) President’s Program highlights the work of its members across different organizations. In this session, APALA members will share their experiences and the impact of their work to the profession and the communities they served. 

An Alternative to Open Source Textbooks: A Case Study of a Library Spearheading a Campaign to Reduce Students’ Textbook Costs by Partnering with a Textbook Rental Company 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Reports have circulated in the news for some time that college textbooks cost too much. In fact, Weisbaum stated, “the average student in this country [USA] spends around $1,200 a year on books and supplies. A single book can cost as much as $200.”[i] In addition, one survey reported, “[S]even out of 10 college students will avoid purchasing a required textbook because of price.”[ii] Furthermore, Richard, Cleavenger, and Storey stated, “Students are increasingly questioning the need to purchase the required textbook for their courses and are actively seeking out alternative solutions.”

This presentation will describe a small private college library’s experiences implementing an innovative eTextbook pilot program with the goal of reducing students’ textbook costs. The project originally began with the researchers’ attempt to work with a mainstream library vendor. We believed students having access to their etextbooks through a library platform they were already familiar with would be more likely to succeed because the user experience was already familiar (i.e. interacting with existing library databases) and, therefore, they would have a more streamlined user experience. However, attempts to broker a deal with this vendor fell through due to the vendor’s 11th hour expectation that our institution utilize one publishing house. Despite the initial setback, the researchers managed to broker a deal to provide eTextbooks with an eTextbook rental company. The selected company was publisher agnostic, which meant that the etextbooks required by the faculty would be used in the pilot with no need for substitutions.

This pilot program took place during the spring 2018 semester – from January 2018 – April 2018 – with twelve course sections (a mixture of undergraduate and graduate courses). This presentation will share lessons learned with implementing this eTextbook pilot program, including methods of soliciting faculty and student feedback as well as how we received and shared student eTextbook interaction analytics. This interactive presentation will frequently solicit audience participation and provide ample time for Q&A.

Strengthening Libraries as Entrepreneurial Hubs
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 22, 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
This session will highlight lessons that have emerged from the Urban Libraries Council’s work in partnership with the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation on strategies for strengthening libraries as entrepreneurial hubs. It will draw on the work of 12 library systems that are participating in a learning cohort focusing on the unique role of libraries in reaching and engaging populations most in need of guidance and support including immigrants, people of color, justice-involved individuals, women and veterans. The session will also provide an early introduction on research to create benchmarks to support all libraries in assessing their work as entrepreneurial hubs.

Talking with Kids about Race: A 'How to' Workshop
Type: Program/Workshop
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 22, 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m
Move from the “what” to the “how” of talking with kids about race in this dynamic workshop. A panel of facilitators, with diverse backgrounds, perspectives, workplaces, and experiences, will lead an examination of how to talk about and address race and racism with young people. Presenters will cover individual and systemic racism, intersectionality, and white fragility, as well as participant-guided topics to give attendees concrete tools and the confidence to address these issues with young people in the communities they serve. Hands-on, interactive activities and smaller group discussions will give the participants experience and first-hand knowledge to bring back to their institutions and implement immediately. Participants will be able to apply the knowledge they gain from this program in many contexts including through formal programming, in one-on-one interactions with the youth that they serve, as well as with the community at large, colleagues, and the leadership of their institutions. This work will contribute to the equity and inclusion of libraries, schools, and, ultimately, the communities that we serve and will create welcoming spaces for all youth, including those young people from marginalized and underserved communities.

Turning Enemies into Advocates: How Empathy-Based Training Eliminated Barriers Between Youth & Our Staff
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
For many library systems, the relationship between staff and teenagers is a contentious one. Many of us see teens as disruptive and inconsiderate and it’s often showcased in the quality of our customer service. So, it should come as no surprise that many teens don’t view the library as the safe space we strive to be, instead feeling as though librarians are “the enemy”. This workshop will provide you with the information and strategies needed to develop effective training content to enhance your library's ability to provide exceptional customer and make teen advocates out of even the most steadfast enemies.   

A hard look in the mirror: reflecting on the role of the librarian 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 1 p.m. - 2 p.m.
What do you see as the role of a librarian today? What makes us valuable and unique? What are you doing in your current job that you could STOP doing? Why? What could you start doing? The answers to these and many other questions are the building blocks of the Greater Victoria Public Library's Community-Inspired Service Model and rethinking the role of the librarian in our organization.

This session will discuss the evolution of GVPL’s Community-Inspired Library Service. We will showcase GVPL’s Portfolio Service Model that brings together all elements of GVPL’s services and defines key areas of library responsibility including: leadership, customer experience, information services and readers advisory, programming and outreach, community partnerships, facilities, collection, technology, communication and metrics. This approach involves introspection, reflection and profound community involvement. Join us for a hard look in the mirror and be inspired by a refreshing perspective on the impact of libraries and librarians.

Learning Outcomes
Participants will learn more about being a Community Inspired Library.
Participants will evaluate their own service models through a Community Inspired lens.
Provide attendees with a creative toolkit of ideas and practices that can be taken back to their libraries.
Participants will challenge the role of the librarian in their organization.
Provide examples of 12 different librarian portfolio models

ACRL President’s Program: Equity, Diversity, Inclusion... and Leadership: Where Do We Go From Here? 
Type: President’s Program
Level of Understanding: Advanced
June 22, 10:30 a.m. - 12 p.m.
Issues of equity in diverse workplaces, and the trend towards more inclusive language and policies, often leaves leaders in the difficult position of navigating the needs of the organization and the need to help the organization accommodate today's workforce. How can leaders effectively influence and motivate their teams, when the individuals on those teams struggle with the challenges of poor communication, collaboration, culture, change and conflict? Dr. Angela Spranger, author of Why People Stay: Helping Your Employees Feel Seen, Safe, and Valued addresses contemporary issues around diversity, leadership, and inclusiveness throughout the employment lifecycle. Through intensive dialogue, shared narrative, and humor supporting the theoretical material, Dr. Spranger shares an approach to inclusive leadership that leaves participants energized and engaged.

Food for Thought: Nourishing the Mind and Body at Public Libraries 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Food insecurity is tied to uncertainty in people’s lives, impacting their health, how they learn, and their work. In the US, 41 million people are living with food insecurity. What’s a library to do? Find out how three libraries addressed food insecurity by building relationships, partnering with stakeholders, and improving the health of their communities. The libraries took different approaches, from teaching and feeding children, to launching a farm-to-library initiative, to welcoming New Americans by bridging cultural gaps using the common language of food to build, sustain, and celebrate community.

Diversity, Equity, and Justice Talks: In and Beyond the Library 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 22, 1 p.m. - 2 p.m.
Technology is often championed as the great equalizer--a perfect set of tools and services that make our libraries run more smoothly, and reach broader audiences. It is important, however, to be critical of the ways technology does or does not address inclusion, equity, or systemic oppression, or indeed exacerbates core problems.

As libraries, archives, and cultural heritage institutions attempt to embed diversity and equity into the core of their institutional practices, it can be helpful to provide ample platforms for discovering, engaging with, and highlighting powerful narratives that reflect the work we must do in order to continue pushing against systemic oppression--or to highlight where we aren’t pushing hard enough.

LITA’s Diversity and Inclusion Committee is hosting three fifteen-minute presentations on topics of choice around diversity, equity, inclusion, or anti-racism and anti-oppression frameworks--to name a few. However, these programs and presentations will be up to the selected presenters to decide, and may or may not directly speak to technology in some format. Whatever their focus, though, they will provide an opportunity for attendees to confront their assumptions and biases, challenge norms and narratives that may dominate their thinking. Our hope is that attendees walk away making connections between presented content and their individual contexts, while opening themselves up to considering how these topics might reflect their individual work or institutional initiatives at large.

The panel will include:
Christine Smith, Collections Services Librarian at Concordia University, Montreal, Canada
Monica Figueroa, Music Cataloging Librarian, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
JJ Pionke, Applied Health Sciences Librarian, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign 

Grassroots Advocacy and Librarians: Using Research Power to Make Change 
Type: Juried Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 1 p.m. - 2 p.m.
PPIRS and ANSS invite you to a panel discussion examining grassroots lobbying, featuring experts who will discuss the mechanics/logistics of grassroots organizing and lobbying as well as how libraries can provide the resources and services necessary in effectively supporting initial or ongoing advocacy efforts. Participants in the program will leave with concrete information and ideas on supporting patrons interested in grassroots advocacy efforts. This program examines how librarians can help patrons in their own efforts to effect change in government and their communities.

Implementing Equity and Diversity Training 
Type: Chair’s Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 1 p.m. - 2 p.m.
Are you looking to add Equity and Diversity training to your staff development? Hear from a panel on how they implement this training.

Keep it LOCAL: Designing effective outreach for children and families in your communities 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 1 p.m. - 2 p.m.
Libraries are increasingly focused on partnerships and outreach to children and families in underserved communities and support literacy, STEM, and family engagement. What steps are you taking to connect with your underserved communities and understand their needs and aspirations? ALSC’s newest white paper presents findings from Project LOCAL, an IMLS-funded study, that examined outreach programs from across the country at small, medium, and large libraries in rural and urban areas to construct a roadmap for outreach program development and delivery. Come to the launch of this white paper, learn about what others are doing, and share your own strategies to serve children and families where they are, build effective partnerships, and ultimately strengthen communities.

Lyrics as Literature: A Musical Approach to Teaching Literacy, Social Justice, and Amplifying Student Voice
Type: Juried Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 22, 1 p.m. - 2 p.m.
Today more than ever school libraries must cultivate learning spaces that advocate for social justice and promote democratic education. According to the AASL Standards, to demonstrate an understanding of and commitment for diversity, School Libraries need to develop their cultural competence and employ culturally responsive pedagogies in their instructional programs to address diverse populations. Music like literature is a bridge, a window, and a mirror to the world. This session will provide participants with a medley of lesson ideas and resources for using lyrics to teach literature, literacy, social justice issues, and to promote student voice. Come feel the beat! 

Telling Stories, Expanding Boundaries: Drag Queen Storytimes in Libraries 
Type: Chair’s Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 22, 1 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
This session will explore the public library as a site for the intersection of gender expression/identity and intellectual freedom, by discussing the phenomenon of Drag Queen Storytime (DGS). The session will consist of a panel featuring both originators of the DGS concept and librarians whose institutions have been involved in DGS. The DGS program has been immensely popular with many audiences at libraries across the country, but it has also produced its share of resistance and controversy. The panel will discuss how DGS was developed and originally implemented, how librarians have been using it today, how institutions have dealt with specific successes and controversies, and how DGS relates to intellectual freedom.

Jean E. Coleman Library Outreach Lecture
Type: Program/Awards
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 2 p.m. - 3p.m.
The Jean E. Coleman lecture series honors Dr. Jean E. Coleman, the first director of the ALA Office for Literacy and Outreach Services (now the Office for Diversity, Literacy and Outreach Services) for her leadership in focusing the associations attention on issues affecting traditionally underserved and underrepresented people in libraries. This year's invited lecturer is Satia Marshall Orange, former director of the Office for Literacy and Outreach Services (OLOS). Under Orange’s leadership, OLOS broadened the association's support of traditionally underserved library staff and library communities, developed new ALA member, units and developed new events and celebrations.

Bolster Academic Libraries as Integral Safe Spaces for Mental Health
Type: Juried Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Libraries hold a unique position as safe spaces that encourage users to seek out and read credible information. Academic libraries are powerful spaces for students who struggle with mental health difficulties. As part of a mental health initiative to become a trauma informed campus, Marshall University libraries launched a partnership with counseling services to utilize the library’s space. These included transforming the study rooms into mental health safe places to decompress and find mental health services across campus. Marshall University Libraries launched a library wide art exhibition titled, Don’t Call Me Crazy: Resiliency through Art, which filled each floor with artwork by students, faculty and staff who suffer from diverse mental health challenges from anxiety and depression to learning disabilities. Partnering with the Counseling Services department, we created innovative panel presentations on various mental health issues, each including ways in which students, faculty and staff could find support. Counseling services held support groups within the library as a continued effort to demonstrate the library as a space of safety whereby all people can come to find information and support. At the end of this panel presentation, attendees will identify the characteristics of a leading library supporting the mental health of its students. Attendees will generate new ideas to advance proposals to support varying mental health agencies. All participants will evaluate and discover how their library space is fundamental to supporting the retention of students with mental health challenges.

Confidently Negotiating Political and Financial Support for your Library 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Stop knocking on the back door of institutions! You can build the confidence to take your rightful place as a community leader!
Forming the Mindset: Librarians have the skills--they can lead initiatives and drive change!
Becoming Relevant: Librarians can prove public library relevance by taking their place at the head table!
Taking it to the Top: Librarians can speed change by challenging community leaders while supporting those in the trenches!
Winning the Prize: Librarians champion vulnerable/marginalized populations--and should feel empowered to demand political and economic support for those efforts! In groups, share your frustrations and plan your attack!

Growing Communities Together: Libraries and Gardens 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Curious about the green things outside the library's windows? Or are you craving green things outside the library's windows? Find out more about how libraries are are embracing gardens. Are you interested in LEED certification or just making your library more sustainable? Does your local food pantry need fresh produce? Are the children in the children's room getting antsy? Are your teens bored? Does your ESL class need a focus? Do your students need a break? Or a hands-on science activity? Gardens are the answer. Learn from model programs around the country. Hear from Peter Villasenor, Branch Manager at Oakland Public LIbrary's Cesar Chavez Branch, about their bilingual seed library and container garden. Explore the National Library of Medicine's healing garden with the Master Gardener who tends it. Find out how a summer reading program at the Arlington (VA) Public Library led to a partnership with the Boy Scouts, the marines and a local food pantry. Take home your very own seeds to get you started on your own garden. Remember when you have a library and a garden, you have everything you need.            

Japan Libraries: Transforming Libraries with Innovative Ideas - How Japanese Public Libraries Engage in Building Better Communities 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
This program introduces how Japanese public libraries develop creative ideas and innovations to transform themselves. It consists of an overview and three cases. 1) A small-Japanese town librarian’s outreach to farmers connects people through books and events to become an information hub in the town. 2) A Japanese prefecture library faces a rapidly aging society and works out programs for senior citizens, collaborating with families of dementia patients as well as local government. 3) A Japanese city library provides hands-on support to would-be entrepreneurs in their business plans; and, to high-school students in realizing their dreams.

Listen Up!: How Libraries Can Help Podcasters Face the Challenges of Preservation 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Indie podcasters are creating works spanning topics reflecting their unique perspectives, backgrounds, and communities. Preserve This Podcast (PTP) is a 2-year Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant-funded project whose goal is to create a podcast, zine and website, all which provide indie podcasters the tools and know-how to organize, backup and describe their digital files.
This workshop aims to step participants through lessons put forth by the PTP podcast. In turn, participants may re-use this teaching model through their respective public programming. PTP also strives to develop general awareness about podcasts among the library field as a powerful teaching and outreach medium.

Will They Stay or Will They Go? ‘Sense of Belonging’ as a Foundation for Creating Inclusive Library Services for International Students 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 22, 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
International students bring diverse perspectives that are essential to U.S. colleges and universities. However, they face more barriers than domestic students. In this program we will explore research on ‘sense of belonging’ as it relates to international students as a basis for creating inclusive library services. Theories of culture shock and student development in an international student services context will provide a perspective for attendees to develop inclusive services appropriate to their unique user populations.

Writing Boxes: How libraries can create diverse, welcoming, intergenerational programming to inspire writing as an integral part of supporting literacy and family engagement
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Librarians who serve children understand one of their core missions is to support reading. Reading is one part of literacy as is writing, listening, and communication. Writing experiences support family engagement, community engagement, close the education gap, facilitate literacy, and support out-of-school learning across the curriculum including STEM. Join youth service librarians, Lisa Von Drasek--University of Minnesota, Jennifer Brown--Bank Street College of Education, Poet Nikki Grimes, author/ activist and founder of 826 National-- Dave Eggers, and the inaugural Ambassador for Children's Literature-- John Scieszka as they provide easy and inexpensive replicable program templates to promote, encourage, and facilitate writing in libraries.

Accessibility and Creation of Online Library Materials: Applying Universal Design for Learning (UDL) 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
In order to serve all patrons, libraries must create accessible materials. Accessibility enables us to serve all library patrons through ADA compliance. Library services and materials are shifting to increasingly more patrons requiring online services and resources. Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is an approach that calls for multiple means of representation, action and expression, and engagement that can be applied to creating online materials. In this panel, a varied and diverse group of librarians will share specific strategies for using the approach of UDL to create instructional objects, marketing materials, online guides, videos, tutorials, and more. 

Agency, Consent and Power in Science Fiction and Fantasy
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Science Fiction and Fantasy has always held a mirror up to nature and continues to explore themes that resonate in contemporary society. As our current culture grapples with issues such sexual assault, bodily autonomy, classism, racism, and consolidation of power, both political and economic, science fiction and fantasy writers have been responding with works that illuminate our current situation. By creating new worlds to set their stories, these authors are able to present trenchant contemporary issues as metaphor, which can make it easier for ideas to be debated and discussed and even subversively change people’s minds. Join a panel of popular genre authors talking about how their work is informed by and informs discussion on the topics of agency, consent, and power in the real world and in the worlds of their own creation.

Building a Digital Community Inside and Outside of the Library
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
This program will demonstrate how libraries are helping residents embrace digital tools, understand its impacts, and establish a digital culture within the community. The program will explore how libraries' build internal staff capacity to become more technologically adept so they can help their residents become more productive digital citizens. The program will then examine how libraries develop programs and services about the digital landscape. Specifically, the program will demonstrate how libraries engage residents about digital tools, provide information about those tools, and build people's skills to make them digitally literate.

Establishing a Culture of Civility in the Library Workplace
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 22, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
This presentation by a library director (and former HR administrator) and an employment law attorney will explore what civility encompasses and the consequences of incivility as it pertains predominantly to library staff.     

Happy Authors, Happy Editors: Tips and Tricks to Getting Published in a Peer-Reviewed Journal 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
This panel brings editors from leading LIS journals to discuss how to get published in a peer-reviewed venue and to increase the chances of the article’s acceptance. We will share our experience as authors and editors; field questions from the audience, and engage participants in interactive exercises, helping future authors to develop an original idea and prepare a complete manuscript; select a journal; respond to reviews and implement revisions; and make use of their articles in practice. Presenters will also share the satisfaction of being an author and a positive view of publishing as a fulfilling process.

History Unfolded: US Newspapers and the Holocaust. Leveraging Libraries to Transform Holocaust Learning
Type: Juried  Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 22, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
History Unfolded: US Newspapers and the Holocaust, a unique citizen history project from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum offers a powerful means to promote historical thinking and media literacy using primary sources. The project allows teachers, students, and history buffs around the country to perform research in library collections and contribute new material to a Museum database of US newspaper reporting on the Holocaust from 1933-1946. In this session, a School Libraries, Holocaust Museum Education Outreach Specialist, Library of Congress Reference Specialist, and Academic Libraries demonstrate how to enrich existing instruction and library programing through involvement in History Unfolded.

Inequity and the Disappearance of Reference and User Services 
Type: President’s Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 22, 4 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Join us for a discussion of the importance of reference and user services in a time when our changing service models create barriers and disadvantage our users.
Libraries value providing equal access to information. Librarianship has finally acknowledged that we must keep equity, diversity, and inclusion at the forefront. But what happens when we change service models without examining how library systems are used by those not in the majority? First generation college students, English language learners, previously incarcerated youth and adults, and others may experience a range of emotions, reactions, and practical barriers to asking for information and help. The disappearing human element of library services may privilege highly independent users who know how to ask questions and when to seek help. We know that some users will persist in seeking help, but not all.
Attendees will begin to recognize how privilege can create barriers, reflect on the lived experiences of their users, and strategize for new models of reference and user services that embrace the needs of all, not just visible, high profile users.

Intersectionality and the Experience of LGBTQ+ Folks
Type: Chair’s Program
Level of Understanding: Advanced
June 22, 4 p.m. - 6 p.m.
LGBTQ+ folks in the library world face a range of issues that often overlap with other forms of oppression, including gender, race, ethnicity, ability, economic status and education level. Queer library folks with multiple identities often struggle to find acceptance and belonging, feeling excluded and invisible within an already marginalized community. This panel explores intersectionality and the ways that multiple forms of oppression are interconnected. Attendees will leave with strategies for building respect for difference, creating open and accepting spaces for LGBTQ staff and library users, and increasing acceptance of people with complex identities.

Knowledge is Global: Expanding the Awareness and Impact of Research from the Global South
Type: Juried Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 22, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
As we move toward a more openly accessible research environment, progress is often framed in terms of increasing access to original studies and associated data published in peer reviewed scholarly journals indexed in databases like Web of Science and Scopus. However, there is a growing awareness that a large body of high quality research from the Global South (aka developing countries in Latin America, Africa, & much of Asia) is not part of that scholarly communications environment. Much of this research is already open access, but because major western databases don’t index most of those journals, it does not register in terms of traditional bibliometrics that use citation counts to measure the impact of authors, their articles and the journals they publish in. For example, just 4% of Latin American peer reviewed journals are included in Web of Science. What can libraries do to help increase the visibility and impact of this large and growing body of research from the Global South? This panel gathers researchers, librarians and policy experts to explore new and innovative ways to change the ways we both access and assess research outputs, and why that is important.

My Self, My World, Included in Books - Use the Free Tool from Teaching Tolerance to Select Diverse Books
Type: Juried Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 22, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Selecting diverse books for classrooms and libraries can be daunting. And what does diverse really mean? Discover how to use Reading Diversity from Teaching Tolerance to consider ways in which the author and the characters in a text contribute to the inclusion of diverse voices in the curriculum. This exceptional, free tool helps librarians recognize and select books that will truly open doors for all students. This model promotes the four distinct but interconnected dimensions of text selection: Complexity, Diversity and Representation, Critical Literacy and Reader and Task.              

Social Unrest, Democracy and Librarianship in the 21st Century
Type: Chair’s Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 22, 4 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
With the ever-growing number of cases of police brutality, voter suppression, hateful incidents, and other social injustices, librarians have tapped into their expertise by creating guides/syllabi centered around these events. Significantly, there has been a rise in the creation and promotion of the “antioppression,” “social justice,” and "voter suppression" libguides that in general, aim to provide a starting point to learn about key social issues and provide resources to communities. Moreover, these “social justice” libguides send a clear message about the current political climate and its impact on the communities they serve. Is this how librarians protest? Are we doing enough? How are these libguides impacting intended audiences? This session will work towards understanding social justice in librarianship. It identifies and analyzes the common reasons librarians who create and promote social justice-themed libguides take on these tasks. Through data collected by survey and a literature review, we will identify useful ways librarians take action at their institutions and articulate how they use various tools to frame their work and support social justice issues.  

When You Can't Go Home Again: Refugee and Exile Authors in the US
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 22, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Facing censorship, threats and uncertainty, refugee and exile authors travel to the U.S., where they confront a new set of obstacles. “When You Can’t Go Home Again” will explore the challenges authors experience in countries around the world, and issues that they encounter after moving to the States. These issues range from locating an interested publisher and depending on a translator, to resisting self-censorship and being aware of the ever-watchful presence of their home country. After taking an eye-opening exploration into the realm of international writings and translations, attendees will gain insight into how they can welcome these authors on their shelves and in their libraries.

Accessibility for All: Screen Readers 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 23, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.
Over 25 million Americans are blind or have low vision and would benefit from access to a computer equipped with screen reading software. There are many different options available to libraries when choosing which screen reading software to make accessible to their patrons. This session will compare those options, discuss creating partnerships with outside organizations, and how to better extend outreach to include all patrons. Attendees will also learn about resources and opportunities to improve their ability to assist patrons who are blind or have low vision. Time will be allotted at the end for a question and answer session.

Bringing Global to Local: The Horner Fellowship Arizona-Japan Librarian Exchange 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 23, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.
The Arizona-Japan Horner Fellowship program was established in 1989 with an endowment to the Arizona Library Association (AzLA) given by Layton and Marian Horner. Since then, twenty-eight Horner Fellows have visited Japan or Arizona libraries and museums. These visits are administered by the Horner Fellowship Committee (AzLA) with assistance from the International Relations Committee of the Japan Library Association. In this presentation, Horner representatives will discuss the evolution of the Fellowship, the selection criteria, and the experiences and professional benefits of the Arizona and Japanese library professionals who have traveled with the support of Horner funds.

Changing the Service Culture of your Library 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 23, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.
Building a new service culture happens when staff are invested, engaged, and understand the direction of the library. Mobilizing staff to create new habits that have long-term impacts on service is the key to affecting cultural change. This session will assist library leaders in identifying practical strategies to create a system-wide change focused on improving customer relationships.        

Ensuring Everyone Counts (and is Counted) in the 2020 Census 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 23, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.
The 2020 Census will determine federal representation, billions of dollars of federal and state funding, and essential demographic data. Even more is at stake for libraries as this Census will be the first with an internet response option, and government distrust is on the rise. A panel of national experts will discuss the implications of the 2020 Census and how libraries can help ensure a complete and inclusive count. Attendees will gain practical strategies for engaging diverse residents and community partners, plus resources for advocating with government decisionmakers about the vital roles of libraries in this essential civic effort.              

Machine Learning: How does it work?!
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 23, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.
You've probably heard of machine learning, but how does it work, and what does that mean for libraries? In this talk I'll make you laugh - and then think - as we walk through real-world examples. You'll get a high-level overview of how neural nets work and you'll get to explore Hamlet, a prototype library discovery interface based in neural nets. You'll also see why machine learning might NOT be the right tool for your job, due to its limitations, biases, and social risks.

NASA @ My Library: STEM Programming and Strategic Planning 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 23, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.
Solano County Library was one of 75 libraries across the United States selected for the [email protected] My Library program, which supports STEM education and programs for rural and economically challenged communities. Learn how Solano County Library enabled its staff to utilize NASA resources to engage and foster relationships within those communities. Participants will have the opportunity to engage with hands-on STEM materials provided through the [email protected] My Library Project and will be provided information on how to access regional partners, local astronomers, and NASA subject matter experts. 

Wholehearted Librarianship: Finding Hope, Inspiration, and Balance  
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 23, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.
We should bring our hearts to work, and qualities such as empathy, emotional intelligence, and reflective action are all part of this process. Service steeped in humanism, compassion, and understanding should be the cornerstone of what we do, and why we do it, for all members of our communities, including the underserved. Join Dr. Michael Stephens for an exploration of the importance of accessible, welcoming and responsive library environments that invite open and equitable participation, as well as an examination of which factors are preventing many libraries from ramping up community engagement and user-focused services.

Alexa for Business and USC Libraries
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 23, 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
With the rapid advancement of artificial intelligence (A.I.), there is a growing interest in applying this technology in higher education (Adams Becker et al., 2017; Roddy, 2017; Seckel, 2017), and in library service particularly (Enis, 2018a). Amazon Alexa is one of the best-known consumer products employing A.I. technology. It enables businesses to develop customized applications and knowledge base within the organizational context and allows users to query directions, manage devices in conference rooms, organize events in their calendar, and report building or equipment problems. Library vendors also recognize the potential of Alexa for Business such as EBSCO and Demco.

Censorship Beyond Books
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 23, 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
People learn and experience life in a wide variety of ways; not just books. Librarians engage and educate their communities using displays and programs. Just as books can be censored, displays, programs and other non-book resources and services come under fire. While the profession is well-versed in protecting the right to read books, many libraries lack policies and experience in protecting the right to access information and services beyond books, often in the form of content created by their staff. During this hour, three librarians will share their experience of challenges to non-book resources.

Laura Broderick will discuss the amendment of a Black Lives Matter display in the children’s department of the Pikes Peak Library District after a larger conversation triggered by a patron complaint.
Phoebe Larson will discuss the challenge to the Saint Paul Public Library’s Drag Queen Story Hour.
Sarah Ward will discuss the internal challenge to the Hunter College Library’s Banned Books Week display.
Kristin Pekoll will discuss her experience with a challenge to an online LGBTQ reader’s advisory list for teens at the West Bend Community Memorial Library.

The session will be moderated by Kristin Pekoll, author of the book, Beyond Banned Books: Defending Intellectual Freedom throughout Your Library and assistant director of ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom. ALA Editions will have copies available at the program and at the ALA Store.

Panelists will detail the tools and resources they used to survive the experience as well as those they wished had been available. Answering questions such as; “what would you do different?” “what advice would you give a new librarian to prepare for such a challenge?” and “how has this changed you as a librarian?”; these intellectual freedom fighters will expand the expertise and experience in the area of censorship—beyond books.

Co-Creating Library/Social Services Partnerships: A Statewide Collaboration 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 23, 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Come learn about a statewide partnership between the Massachusetts Library System (MLS), the Department of Mental Health (DMH), and the Project for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH). This program will cover resources to better serve patrons experiencing homelessness and/or mental illness. This collaboration was generated by discussion at library/social services forums and a statewide survey assessing interest in library/social work partnerships. The MLS/DMH/DMH partnership, connecting librarians with staff training on mental illness and homelessness as well as connecting them with their local Homeless Outreach Coordinators, serves as a public library/public health partnership model that can be replicated.

Everyone, Everywhere, Every Time: Universal Design as a Best Practice for Accessing Abilities 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 23, 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
All learners have varying needs and abilities. Universal Design for Learning (UDL) employs a variety of instructional methods to eliminate barriers to learning and offer all learners opportunities for success. This session presents the impact of accessibility and the integration of tools and resources that facilitate multi-modal learning for all, along with concrete strategies for implementing accessibility and multi-modal learning into physical and digital environments. 

Ready To Learn: Public Media and Library Partnerships for Early Science and Literacy Learning
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 23, 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
It’s a beautiful day in the neighborhood when libraries and PBS stations partner to support early science and literacy learning. The CPB-PBS Ready To Learn initiative, funded by the U.S. Department of Education, supports these partnerships by funding free, research-based learning resources and developing a new collaborative model of community engagement serving low-income neighborhoods. Library and station representatives from Kentucky and Tennessee, along with representatives from the CPB and PBS, will discuss how they've cultivated effective partnerships and demonstrate free resources and tools to better serve the early learning needs of low-income families with children ages 2 to 8.

Building Equity From the Ground Up 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 23, 1 p.m. - 2 p.m.
Addressing equity issues in our communities with a results-based approach can be challenging and overwhelming. Where does an organization even start? This was the problem faced by Los Angeles County Library leadership. LA County is one of the largest and most diverse jurisdictions in the country and faces daily challenges with race inequity, homelessness, immigration struggles and more. With 87 libraries, the Library is strongly positioned in its communities, but wanted to elevate their efforts to make a lasting impression on customers' quality of life. To accomplish this goal, the iCount @ the Library initiative was created. iCount: Removing Barriers to Equity @ Your Library is Los Angeles County Library's innovative service model that ensures the Library is making a conscious effort to design services and programs that address the needs of the diverse community it serves, which includes customers of different age, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, socio-economic status, physical ability, nationality, legal status and more. iCount is designed to reduce barriers to access and engages all levels of staff to be part of the solution by guiding them through the process of creating Library Equity Action Plans (LEAPs) for each of their communities. Supervisors also learn how to facilitate discussions in each of their branch libraries and in non-public facing divisions on these different equity issues, then work together with all levels of staff to develop and implement their LEAP. The iCount initiative empowers staff to become more aware of key social issues in their local communities. They learn to identify areas of inequity and become more sensitive to customers' unique needs, purposefully designing programs that provide localized solutions. Participants at this workshop will receive a copy of the equity tool and other training materials to use and adapt to their own organizational needs. LA County Library staff will be walk participants through the iCount toolkit, including the process of leading staff discussions around equity and developing a community-responsive Library Equity Action Plan. Participants will also hear about the actual LEAPs developed by libraries to use as inspiration in their own organizations. Participants will also learn how the Library created engagement and buy-in from staff and how they supported staff efforts to avoid work overload.

Looking Back, Moving Forward: The Brown Bookshelf Shines a Light on Black Children’s Literature 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 23,1 p.m. - 2 p.m.
Looking to expand your collection? Award-winning children’s book creators and Brown Bookshelf team members Paula Chase-Hyman, Kelly Starling Lyons, Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich, Gwendolyn Hooks and Tameka Fryer Brown give concrete tips to help librarians include classic and contemporary Black children’s literature in their collections in meaningful ways that can enhance teaching and learning. Through personal stories, book talks, readalikes and activity suggestions, they share how books by Black creators of today stand on the shoulders of those of the past and why child and adult readers need both.

Not a Kid Anymore: How and Why to Serve Adults with Disabilities in the Adult Department 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 23, 1 p.m. - 2 p.m.
Adults with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities often enjoy materials and programs designed for children, but does that mean that these adults are best served in your library's children's room or children's programs? This session will help you understand that, while children's librarians can play a role in developing appropriate programs, adults with disabilities are better served in your library's adult department. The session will introduce you to a partnership between a children's and an adult services librarian, useful inclusion strategies, and proven programming ideas that you can successfully implement in your own library.

Preparing for a Changing World: How Libraries Facilitate the Acquisition of New Skill Sets in Communities 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 23,1 p.m. - 2 p.m.
The 2019 International Papers Program theme is: Preparing for a Changing World: How Libraries Facilitate the Acquisition of New Skill Sets in Communities. In this session, speakers will share on international library projects, trends and issues relating to new skills sets (and literacies) that can range from health and new media literacy to dialogue and negotiation, skills that have become critical in our world today.

The International Papers & Projects Program provides librarians with an opportunity to exchange information about library services, collections and projects throughout the world, as well as introduce U.S. librarians to international library matters.

Real Talk: A Framework for Youth-Led Dialogues 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 23, 1 p.m. - 2 p.m.
Founded by youth to discuss the issues that are important to them, Real Talk is a youth-led conversation forum that has become the centerpiece of programming at the Waltham Public Library Teen Room. Twice a month, four teen leaders lead their peers in activities that promote youth voice, encourage socioemotional learning, and develop awareness of social justice issues in our community. Over the three years we have run this program, we have developed a curriculum to sustain the work of our founders and guide librarians in developing similar programs in their libraries. We’re excited to share it with you! 

Subverting Other People’s Elections: History and Resources
Type: Chair’s Program
Level of Understanding: Advanced
June 23, 1 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
Russian interference in the 2016 election has generated enormous concern. In this program award-winning journalist, author, and scholar Stephen Kinzer will discuss the history of attempts to subvert elections in other countries and resources that provide information about these attempts. Kinzer worked for the New York Times for more than twenty years and currently writes for The Boston Globe. He has taught journalism, political science, and international relations at Northwestern and Boston Universities, and now at Brown University. The most recent of his many books is The True Flag: Theodore Roosevelt, Mark Twain, and the Birth of American Empire (2017). 

Authentically Celebrating African American Culture with Coretta Scott King Nonfiction Books In Your Library and Classroom
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 23, 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Celebrating 50 years in 2019, the Coretta Scott King Book Awards has selected the best books by and about African Americans since 1970. Join this session to learn about the superb nonfiction books that have been recognized by this award, and take back to your library ready-to-use materials that make it easy and culturally relevant to feature them in your library program and/or classroom instruction. Primary source author interviews will be emphasized. This event is produced in partnership with the American Library Association’s Coretta Scott King Book Awards, a committee of the Ethnic and Multicultural Information Exchange Round Table.

Bringing Genius Hour to your School: Implementing a Schoolwide Passion Project Program
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 23, 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Learn how to introduce and implement a school wide 20% time, passion project, or Genius Hour program on your campus. This session will provide valuable information from understanding why it is imperative for librarians to initiate innovative library programming, to enlisting teachers to co-teach, to the benefits for all students who participate. Participants will walk away with a basic framework on which they can build a whole new, innovative library program which supports school curriculum, provides a venue for students to gain essential 21st Century skills, while utilizing the fundamentals of research and study skills.

Managing to Manage: Strategies for Both Extroverted & Introverted Managers Who Feel Overworked and Overwhelmed 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 23, 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
New managers often experience a spike in stress levels that impact both their physical and mental health. In this session, you’ll learn how stress impacts your body and brain, strategies for coping and developing resilience in your new role, and discover tips, tricks, hacks and activities for establishing a healthy work/life balance. Co-panelists Amy Tureen (extrovert) and Amanda Melilli (introvert) have scoured the literature on resilience, stress-reduction, and mindfulness; personally tested the leading recommendations on your behalf; and identified what really works (and what really, really, really doesn’t) for both introverts and extroverts.  

Minority-Serving Institution Academic Libraries: Responsive Leadership, Transformative Services and Radical Inclusion 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Advanced
June 23, 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
The California State University (CSU) is the nation’s largest four-year public university system, with 23 campuses and eight off-campus centers while the University of California (UC) system, also a public university system, is the most comprehensive and advanced postsecondary educational system in the world with distinguished faculty and 63 Nobel Laureates. California also has the largest community college system in the U.S., making up 50% of all public higher education in California.

California is a minority majority state with two public higher education systems, CSU and the California community college system, that are the largest in the nation. The population growth is expected to steadily increase as Latinx and Asian American and Pacific Islanders are the fastest growing ethnic groups, thus, college graduates in both groups are vital to the future economy of the nation. Unfortunately, these groups are not accessing higher education at the same rate as their peers.

Most of California’s public higher education systems are minority serving institutions (MSIs) so they have a critical role in educating and graduating students from traditionally underserved communities. The demographic shift and the direction of these public systems will likely influence, nationwide, student retention/success initiatives, hiring practices, faculty RTP, and transition the campus DNA to one of radical inclusion with social justice as a core value. The changes, challenges and opportunities faced by California’s public colleges and universities and their academic libraries are a model for what higher education nationwide might look like in the near future.

Two faculty librarians and three library deans will present a panel discussion outlining the emerging case study of California’s public systems and the impact on their representative libraries’ leadership, service delivery, first year/student success programs, community engagement, information literacy, residency programs, and their commitment to social justice. 

LITA President’s Program with Meredith Broussard: Artificial Unintelligence
Type: President’s Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 23, 3 p.m. - 4 p.m.
Our collective enthusiasm for applying computer technology to every aspect of life has resulted in a vast number of poorly designed systems. We are so eager to do everything digitally—hiring, driving, paying bills, even choosing romantic partners—that we have stopped demanding that our technology actually work.

In this talk, author and professor Meredith Broussard looks at the inner workings and outer limits of technology, and explains why we should never assume that computers always get things right. Making a case against technochauvinism—the belief that technology is always the solution—Broussard looks at why self-driving cars don’t really work and why social problems persist in every digital Utopia. If we understand the limits of what we *can* do with technology, Broussard tells us, we can make better choices about what we *should* do with it to make the world better for everyone.

Data journalist Meredith Broussard is an assistant professor at the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute of New York University and the author of “Artificial Unintelligence: How Computers Misunderstand the World.” Her academic research focuses on artificial intelligence in investigative reporting, with a particular interest in using data analysis for social good. She is also interested in reproducible research issues and is developing methods for preserving innovative digital journalism projects in scholarly archives so that we can read today’s news on tomorrow’s computers. She is an affiliate faculty member at the Moore Sloan Data Science Environment at the NYU Center for Data Science, a 2019 Reynolds Journalism Institute Fellow, and her work has been supported by the Institute of Museum & Library Services as well as the Tow Center at Columbia Journalism School. A former features editor at the Philadelphia Inquirer, she has also worked as a software developer at AT&T Bell Labs and the MIT Media Lab. Her features and essays have appeared in The Atlantic, Slate, and other outlets. Follow her on Twitter @merbroussard or contact her via meredithbroussard.com. 

Bystander or Change Agent? An Examination of Big Ten Academic Alliance Social Media Content for Radical Democracy
Type: Juried Program
Level of Understanding: Advanced
June 23, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
In the midst of great environmental, political, economic, and social disruption, academic libraries make difficult social media curation decisions that can range anywhere on the spectrum between: (1) acting as change agents in local and global communities; (2) remaining neutral and present all points of view; and (3) ignoring external voices and acting as oblivious bystanders.

Through academic library social media expressions, librarians can act as gatekeepers, ultimately supporting hegemonic structures of regulation and control. Lack of pragmatic knowledge impedes librarians’ abilities to use social media as a tool for radical democracy, and can ultimately silence patrons instead of sharing power and transforming communities. This study/presentation, which examines social media practices through a Critical Theory lens, fills a gap in library science upon which scholarship and praxis can be built to better serve populations for democratic empowerment.

Methodology: Grounded in a Radical Democracy framework (Leckie, Given, & Buschman, 2010), we used a mixed-methods applied linguistics approach to examine public and private academic libraries’ social media practices in Twitter. We independently examined fourteen Big Ten Academic Alliance (BTAA) libraries’ tweets posted from January 1, 2018 - May 20, 2018. For over 4,000 posts, we qualitatively identified the voices represented and silenced in the content, and developed the following analytical categories: 1-Library-centered; 2-Student-centered; 3- College/School/University-centered; 4-External content (i.e. news, corporations, etc); and (4) Other. Afterwards, we analyzed how each of the posts served as a vehicle for radical democracy, and independently we assigned numerical value between 0 and 3 to qualitatively rank the post: 0-absent entirely; 1-neutral; 2-implicit support of radical democracy; 3-overt support of radical democracy.

The researchers compared coding for interrater reliability, and through feminist exchanges (Bloom, 1998), we reached consensus on divergent cases. Quantitatively, we calculated frequencies per institution for each of the the analytical categories, as well as comprehensively for the BTAA as a whole. In addition, we calculated each institution’s radical democracy value, as well as scoring the BTAA comprehensively.

Findings: Our ongoing analysis reveals preliminary findings. Based on our analytical categories, the majority of content tweeted is inward facing: library-centered content. External content, and the opportunity to connect students to communities outside of their home institution, falls short. This reveals a disconnect between BTAA libraries commitment to social justice practices and their social media presence on their Twitter accounts. In addition, preliminary data identifies very few institutions that used their Twitter content as a tool for radical democracy. They have the largest followings and the most interactions, in spite of representing ideological and political content. Most surprisingly, despite libraries serving as the keystone of student creativity and achievement, very little student-centered content is tweeted.

Significance: This study/presentation is a starting place for social media managers in academic libraries to examine their tweeting practices and explore strategies to engage in radical democracy practices.

Closing Equity Gaps in School Libraries: An Inquiry-based Approach 
Type: Juried Program
Level of Understanding: Advanced
June 23, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Equity is a core value for School Libraries, but how do you determine if you have equity gaps in your program? In this interactive session, participants will experience an inquiry-based approach to exploring what equity means in a school library environment, reflecting upon and evaluating their program through a student perspective, and identifying a change idea to implement that could address a potential equity gap. Equity gaps in opportunity, access, or attainment for students can be addressed effectively through intentional school library practices. The student perspective on policies, the library environment, and access to resources and meaningful learning experiences inform librarians as they develop change ideas. The AASL shared foundation INCLUDE acts as a connector to school and district goals supporting inclusive and equitable outcomes for all.

Creating a Community Profile to Learn More about Your Current and Potential Patrons 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 23, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
With flat budgets, many libraries are trying to figure out how to better match needed services with those who need them. The process of creating a community profile gives us an opportunity to do an in-depth data dive into the population we serve and to become aware of shifts in the local population over time. Whether you’re looking to create a strategic plan, consider a millage renewal, or refresh the services and collections of your library, a community profile can help you gain the data you need to gain allies, collaborators, and supportive stakeholders.

In this session, we’ll give you a head start on where you can find a variety of data sources to get a multidimensional view of your community, with a particular focus on the Federal Reserve of St. Louis's FRED resources for government, economic, and geospatial data. From mapping subprime credit scores to tapping into consumer profiles to monitoring the health, education, and even housing stock of your service population, there are so many lenses through which to see your community.

But data are just numbers until you know which questions to ask. So we’ll explore some data together to sharpen our analysis skills and consider when to consider longitudinal data over current snapshots.

Finally, we’ll consider how trends in our community’s data might help us consider future services, staffing plans, collections, and programs.

Bring your laptop so you can get started with your profile right in the session, and we’ll send you off at session’s end with strategies for continuing the work when you get back to your library.

Learning from Each Other: Intergenerational Learning with Storytelling and STEM 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 23, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
When families use STEM concepts to tell their own stories that center around their culture, creativity, and values, learning comes to life. Hear about the transformative partnership between a public library, university research team, science center, and community-based organizations that codesigned family programs incorporating stories, robotics, and e-textiles. At the heart of this learning is family storytelling, a practice that brings folks of all ages together in a culturally responsive, strengths-based way. Attendees will learn ways to design intergenerational learning experiences by prioritizing storytelling in STEM programs.  

Spectrum Chair's Program: Imposter Syndrome
Type: Chair’s Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 23, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.

Characterized by feelings of uneasiness, anxiety, and fear of being found out a "fraud," imposter syndrome refers to a relatively common psychological phenomenon experienced by folks in the workplace. For LIS folks of color, the intersections of gender, race, ethnicity, ability, and other identities interplay with imposter syndrome in unique ways. Coordinated by the Spectrum Advisory Committee, this panel will feature library folks of color from a variety of library types and career points on their experiences with imposter syndrome and tips for overcoming it in the workplace.

The Best in New Tech for Readers with Blindness, Visual Impairments, and Physical Disabilities 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 23, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
The number of Americans experiencing visual impairment is expected to double by 2050. Thankfully, readers who live with vision loss can use new technology to continue their lifelong love of books and learning. Improvements to technology are helping to close the inequitable divide between the amount of content available to the visually impaired and their sighted peers. In this session, attendees will learn how new devices can help library users with print disabilities continue reading and improve their quality of life. Attendees will return to their libraries feeling prepared to assist users of all abilities improve their quality of life.

Beyond Collection Development: Creating Queer-Inclusive Elementary School Library Programming 
Type: Juried Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 24, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.
Advocating and planning for queer-inclusive elementary school library programming is frequently limited to collection development efforts. Often, librarians feel constrained or unprepared to implement services and programs that support queer children and their families. In addition, these professionals may face challenges from community members, fellow educators, or school administration when attempting to deliver these services. In this presentation, we will define queer-inclusive programs and services, describe creative initiatives, identify potential barriers, and offer strategies and resources to face these challenges. Participants will engage in collaborative conversations on positioning themselves as advocates for this population of young students.

Difficult Discussions: Diversity in Digital Collections and Archives 
Type: Juried Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 24, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.
Ensuring broad and diverse representation in digital archives and collections is crucial. Diversity can involve a number of factors, including diversity of opinion, ability, ethnicity, race, gender, culture, socioeconomic status, religion, language, and sexual orientation. Unless digital archives and collections are able to include materials representing a wide spectrum of human experience, they can only tell partial and incomplete stories. Unfortunately, a number of barriers, such as the cost of, and access to, technology, can limit the scope of digital collections and prevent them from being truly inclusive. Diversity among those creating and maintaining these collections is particularly vital, both for its own sake and in order to avoid perpetuating “blind spots” in the selection of materials for acquisition and digitization projects.

“Difficult Discussions: Diversity in Digital Collections and Archives,” co-sponsored by the Digital Scholarship Section (DSS), the Literatures in English Section (LES), and the European Scholarship Section (ESS) of ACRL will address difficult questions about the causes of under-representation of marginalized groups in digital archives. This will include an examination of the professional attitudes and habits that have historically contributed to a lack of diversity. This program will take the form of a panel discussion with librarians, archivists, scholars and community members who have been chosen because of their work with digital archives, collections, or projects that foreground diverse voices and social justice. Panelists will share topical insights based in their roles as creators, curators, or users of digital content, and in their personal experiences as members of marginalized/non-English language communities themselves. In conversation with each other, the moderator, and the audience, the panelists will identify barriers to inclusivity in digital collections and archives, providing a basis on which participants may begin to formulate successful strategies for mitigating barriers at their own institutions.

Participants will gain an understanding of what diversity in digital collections and archives means, learn about current barriers to diverse representation, and hear about strategies for mitigating those barriers that have been implemented in other digital library and archive projects. The program is aimed at professionals engaging in digital exhibit, digital library, archive and community engaged digital projects; and may be valuable for librarians and archivists who wish to expand representation of marginalized groups in their collections and/or learn more about problems surrounding diversity in digital archives and libraries. Participants will hear from scholars and community members representing marginalized/non-English language communities. Panelists will share their experiences with digital archives, libraries and projects to share with attendees their perspectives and spark questions and discussion among program participants about designing more diverse digital collections. In addition to a question and answer period with the panelists, attendees will be encouraged to share their own experiences with the topic in order to bring other voices into the conversation. Following the program, DSS and LES plan to offer collectively-composed program notes to be shared widely, in order to continue the discussion among interested panelists, participants, and individuals who are interested in these issues but unable to attend the program. We will also invite participants and panelists to join an ad-hoc working group to create a set of guidelines, recommendations, or a white paper to address issues of diversity in digital collections moving forward.

Mindfulness in Librarianship 
Type: Juried Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 24, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.
Are your students increasingly overwhelmed, stressed, or unable to focus? What about you? Mindfulness has great potential to address these concerns as well as to improve student learning, enhance service levels and collaborative relationships, and create more welcoming and inclusive library spaces. This workshop will explore the value of mindfulness practices personally and professionally, and provide examples of how mindfulness can play a role in teaching and learning, the library environment, and programming. While addressing many contexts for mindfulness in librarianship, this practical session will provide participants with an opportunity to discuss mindfulness and its applications for their communities and to practice mindfulness and see how it impacts them. Takeaways include resources for further learning, practical, low-cost strategies for integrating mindfulness in librarianship, and simple mindfulness techniques that participants can apply right away at home or at work.

No More Silos: Keys to Implementing Self-Management to Fully Empower Staff 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 24, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.
When challenged to create an organizational chart for your library that was patron-focused, it is unlikely we would come up with the cumbersome, siloed org charts we now have. The Hillsboro (OR) Public Library did away with traditional departments, replacing Circulation, Reference, and Technical Services with four quadrants that speak to the experiences we want patrons to have. How did we do it? By learning from the self-management, or holacracy, movement, and implementing a new structure that prioritized supporting staff expertise, allowed for significant cross-training, and empowered staff to manage their own time and participate more fully in organizational projects.

Reaching Vulnerable Families through Collaborative Partnerships
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 24, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.
Research shows that acquisition of early literacy skills improves young children's lives and paves the way toward their success as adults. When different groups partner together, they can create impactful programs that reach targeted vulnerable populations. A panel of partners will describe steps taken to set-up Mother Goose on the Loose: Goslings for parents of premature babies and highlight the impact this programmatic partnership has had on vulnerable communities. In addition to hearing about challenges and benefits of unique outreach opportunities and partnerships, participants will receive tips and tools that will enable them to establish successful partnerships in atypical settings.

The Sense of the Self: How Identity Informs Academic Librariesship 
Type: Juried  Program
Level of Understanding: Advanced
June 24, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.
This session will examine diversity and inclusion in librarianship as seen through an autoethnographic lens. It will bring together library professionals across a range of roles and areas—such as those within public services, technical services, and administration—who have engaged in meaningful self-reflections of their experiences and personal identities and how these have directly informed their daily work. It will also feature perspectives from library professionals from different stages of their careers, including veteran librarians and in particular, new and emerging voices in the profession.

Three Takes on Transforming Spaces and Services for Student Success in the Library and across Campus 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 24, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.
How is your library part of the campus conversation regarding student success? This panel will look at how three different institutions have been implementing services and spaces for student support and learning –- across the campus and within the library. American University has looked broadly at this topic through their RiSE (Reinventing the Student Experience) initiative to address the needs of their dramatically changing student body and to foster inclusion, retention, and academic success. Barnard College and Hunter College have designed new libraries to transform opportunities to support student success and offer expanded modes of research and learning.

Transforming Communities through Health Outreach and Programming 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 24, 9 a.m. - 10 a.m.
Are you interested in offering or increasing health outreach and programming at your library? Whether you are a small rural library with limited staff, part of a large library system or somewhere in between there are ways that you can help to create a culture of health in your community. This session will provide you with examples of both active and passive outreach and program ideas for youth, adults and seniors using freely available and reliable health information resources. Come and learn about the trusted health information resources from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and other reputable agencies that can be used for health outreach. You will learn how to effectively introduce community members to NLM resources in fun and engaging ways. You will also learn where to order and download freely available health outreach materials for distribution. Information on free tools for creating games and promotional materials will also be provided.

This session will also introduce attendees to the American Library Association (ALA) and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) Libraries Transform Health Literacy Toolkit. The ALA/NNLM health literacy toolkit can be used to advocate for improved health and wellness in your community and encourage partnerships with local agencies. NNLM promotes health information by equipping library staff with effective skills and high-quality resources to meet the needs of their users. This is done through training, facilitating partnerships and funding for health outreach. Attendees will leave session with access to ready to use health outreach activity and “programs in a box” on topics such as doctor-patient communication, substance use awareness for youth, and health observance awareness. 

Exhibiting Library History at California State University, Fullerton 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 24, 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Exhibiting the history of your library offers you an opportunity to engage with your community in a creative way. This presentation provides insights to the conception, development and installation of a library history exhibit. We will discuss exhibits as teaching tools and learn timesaving tips or techniques in using artifacts and resources in your library.

Safer Libraries: Building Staff Resiliency and Library Safety Branch by Branch 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 24, 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
In 2017 The DC Public Library collaborated with Defend Yourself, a local company that works to empower people — especially women and others targeted for abuse and assault — to end violence and create a world where they can be fully themselves. Our students learn skills to help them prevent, heal from, and end violence and abuse.Together, DCPL and Defend Yourself developed a library-specific safety training for staff that teaches self-defence concepts such as avoidance and prevention, assertiveness, direct communication, and boundary setting, deescalation, and bystander intervention. DCPL piloted this training with twenty frontline staff from throughout our system of twenty-seven libraries. Based on the positive feedback from staff, DCPL launched system-wide training in the summer of 2018. The plan included training each branch as one cohort with the intention that this type of training can build staff cohesion, provide a shared toolbox of skills and language that the branch staff have and to develop staff resiliency to address difficult situations. This session will discuss the process involved in developing the training, key concepts within the training, and how this training is a part of a larger DCPL vision for building staff resiliency. 

Save As: Managing and Preserving Your Digital Life 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 24, 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Are you looking to offer your patrons guidance as they navigate their digital lives? Join this session to learn how providing resources for DIY digital archiving and classes on personal digital estate planning can help your library users keep up with 21st century information storage. Learn what staff at Tulsa Library are doing to provide digitization equipment, training, and resources for preserving online legacies to their users.

Bringing Culture Back: Managing Unconscious Bias to Strengthen Your Corporate Culture 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 24, 1 p.m. - 2 p.m.
Have you ever examined the sources of unconscious bias? Have you ever understood how cultural values impact our own biases and interactions? Awareness alone does not guarantee success, but the ultimate question is how to take that awareness and put it into action in order to ensure these biases do not influence judgments about others. This directly impacts the library's inclusive work environment and the strength of the corporate culture. This session will allow participants to identify and understand their biases, and provide them with strategies for managing biases to help improve intercultural effectiveness within the library.

Great Ways to Great Stories Grants 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 24, 1 p.m. - 2p.m.
The ALA Great Stories Club is a unique opportunity to grow your voice and impact your community. Learn how several different grants have been administered in settings throughout communities. Find ways to reach the voices of teens that are underserved in your community by working with juvenile detention centers, community foundations, schools and more. This session will touch on all aspects of the Great Stories Club from application to community impact.      

Libraries Advancing Peace with Local Initiatives: Learn Globally, Act Locally 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Intermediate
June 24, 1 p.m. - 2 p.m.
Libraries abroad are becoming leaders in promoting peace globally by taking action in their local communities. In this presentation, we will learn about an Iberbibliotecas-funded Community-Library Inter-Action (CLIA) project entitled “Interact with your community from the public library: Learning and advancing peace from the contexts of Colombia, Costa Rica and Peru.” Each presenter will illustrate how the project was implemented at his or her location and will speak about outcomes that have been observed thus far. There will be time for questions and a resource sheet will be available.

Tragedy, Healing, Understanding: Teaching Civil Rights through Primary Sources and Graphic Novels
Type: Juried Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 24, 1 p.m. - 2p.m.
Civil rights education is often criticized for being limited to biographies of a few leaders and the “I Have a Dream” speech. In this session, you will learn how civil rights resources can transform your collection and the way you teach the civil rights movement. Primary sources from the Library of Congress will be paired with graphic novels to help middle and high school students learn about this decades-long movement. Lesson plans, web sites, and other resources will be shared. The session is appropriate for school and public librarians, and classroom teachers. Finally, participants will join in a discussion about how to make the era relevant to students, and how to connect the civil rights movement with current issues.

Sketchnoting in School 
Type: Juried Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 24, 1 p.m. - 2p.m.
We are incredible at remembering pictures. Hear a piece of information and three days later you'll remember 10% of it. Add a picture and you'll remember 65%. This presentation provides introductory information about Sketchnoting, examples of implementations, & provides hands-on experiences so you can start your journey to becoming a Sketchnoter. 

Subversive Activism: Creating Social Change Through Libraries, Children’s Literature, and Art
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 24, 1 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
This high energy presentation examines activism and social change through multiple lenses: first from two scholarly leaders, Dr. Nicole Cooke from Library & Information Science, and Dr. Janina Fariñas from Pediatric Neuropsychology, then from acclaimed children’s book author/illustrator Yuyi Morales, and finally, from Dr. Karin Perry’s sketchnoting that will document this dynamic event.

Tough topics in YA: How the 2019 debuts are tackling the dark—but real—issues teens care about 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 24, 1 p.m. - 2p.m.
2019 debut YA authors discuss how teens benefit from seeing difficult issues explored on the page and how librarians can use these books to help teens manage tough situations and empathize with others.

Connect the American Indian Youth Literature Award to the Curriculum
Type: Juried Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 24, 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
A quality school library program must reflect the linguistic and cultural pluralism of our country. Empowering Learners asserts that librarians will offer diverse collection materials and services to accommodate the needs of all children. Yet, according to the CCBC, in 2015, out of 3400 books received from US publishers, only 8 books were written by Native Americans and a mere 28 were written about Native Americans. Therefore, the presenter suggests the use of Native American literature for youth as a useful support for teachers of social studies, language arts, art, and music as well as for developing and promoting diverse collections. In this session, the presenters will interactively explore Native American texts and correlated activities which can be used to collaborate with teachers to bolster the curriculum. This presentation will focus on the American Indian Youth Literature Awards. The use of Native American titles, the delivery of associated crafts and activities as well as the use of online resources serve as indispensable tools to assist the librarian in enriching the literary experiences of Native American learners, honoring the Native American experience In the curriculum and celebrating the Native American heritage with all children. In this session, the presenter will share in-depth knowledge of selected titles with correlating crafts and activities. Attendees will leave the session with practical, concrete instructional ideas, ready for immediate use.

A Natural Disaster Shouldn’t Become a Personal Finance Disaster: Addressing Money Management and Fraud Awareness in Your Library’s Disaster Recovery Programs 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 24, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Could your patrons weather a financial emergency? 40% of U.S. adults could not pay for an unexpected $400 expense from their savings, according to the Federal Reserve. The cost of recovering from a natural disaster is often even greater, compounded by the complexities of disaster relief programs. Upgrade your library’s financial literacy programming with expert panelists from different disaster response backgrounds to discuss how personal finance fits into disaster preparedness and recovery, including roles for libraries in financial emergency support and opportunities for connecting with trustworthy partners. Discover key resources for impactful financial emergency preparedness and recovery programs.          

Streaming Video: Confronting the Barriers to Sharing Between Libraries 
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 24, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
How much of your collections budget is now going to streaming videos? Do your licenses include the permissions you want? Because streaming video is a newer medium, libraries are accepting restrictive license agreements that reduce digital inclusion and contribute to the loss of traditional library services, including resource sharing. Presenters will provide data on the need for sharing streaming videos via ILL, provide guidance on how attendees can advocate for the license terms they want, discuss discovery & technology barriers, and share a roadmap for supporting underfunded libraries by including license terms that support all libraries and services.

The quick and dirty guide to avoiding disability faux-pas, building your awareness and library know-how, and getting all your awkward questions answered
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 24, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Did you ever wish you had a chunk of time to really focus on learning about disabilities, disability cultures, and the library experiences and needs of these community members? To talk honestly with peers and get real practical tips and answers? Join us at this workshop for concrete, useful information, service and programming tips, own-voices pieces (written and video) for small group discussion, and open Q&A with self-advocates.. Learn about patrons who are Deaf, hard-of-hearing, blind, low-vision, physically disabled, or on the Autism Spectrum. Presented with ALA attendees who self-identify as disabled, and the DC Office of Disability Rights 

WI+RE: Creating a learner-led instructional design team in your library
Type: Program
Level of Understanding: Introductory
June 24, 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Your library student employees have keen insights on essential breakthroughs and challenges for learners and researchers. They may also be looking for compelling and rewarding ways to make a difference and develop professionally. Join us for this interactive exploration of WI+RE - a truly student led instructional design team that has developed award winning instructional materials and empowered learners to imagine and create their own solutions to essential learning challenges. We'll explore WI+RE's rapid and immersive approach to training in pedagogy and media creation, share the WI+RE instructional design toolkit, and offer advice on building a team at your institution.